Tag Archives: technology

So you have hearing loss too? Soundz Off can help

Welcome to a very large club – 11 million of us in the UK have hearing loss (that’s one in six people) predicted to rise to more than 14.5 million by 2031 (Action on Hearing Loss 2015).  Add this to the 360 million people worldwide with hearing loss and that’s a very big club!

Like all clubs we have something in common – similar interests, ideas, problems and difficulties to overcome. Like all clubs, there’s lots of information out there relating to our speciality interest, yet only 1% of medical research spending goes on hearing loss and it’s surprisingly difficult to find the information we need.  So where do you find that information?

Many people deny they have hearing loss for up to 10 years and, for most of us, our only experience with a hearing professional is being referred to audiology for a hearing test and hearing aids.  Then we get waved off from the hospital and left to our own devices – not helpful when we’re usually reeling with shock at the diagnosis, baffled by the technology and unaware of how to help ourselves (and others) to cope better with this invisible disability.

That’s why I created Soundz Off in 2014 http://www.soundzoff.org – an independent website which brings together hundreds of links to useful websites related to hearing loss: equipment, support organisations, technology, social media, forums, apps, research, events … the list goes on.

As someone with hearing loss myself (I have moderate sensorineural hearing loss in both ears and wear two digital hearing aids), I was amazed to discover this didn’t exist before. Over the years I found hundreds of organisations which exist to support people with hearing loss but nobody ever told me about them – I had to support myself and find them myself one by one. Nobody ever brought that information together in one place … until now.  Soundz Off does the legwork so you don’t have to!  We also have an active Facebook page updated daily with the latest information and news on hearing loss http://www.facebook.com/soundzoff  – how I wish this had existed 20 years ago when I was just starting out on my own hearing loss journey.

Hearing loss affects people in different ways and most of us struggle with this challenging disability.  You’ll probably recognise where you are in your own journey represented by this graph of the different stages of grief:

stages of grief

As someone who’s travelled right though every stage of the curve and eventually adjusted to my own hearing loss – even to the stage where I’m now working as an advocate and welfare officer for people with hearing loss – Soundz Off is my gift to you, whether you’re new to hearing loss or you’ve been coping with hearing loss for a long time.  Discover new information, make new contacts and friends, learn about what’s being doing to cure hearing loss and tell us about organisations you think we should add to our Directory http://www.soundzoff.org/directory

The good news (there’s always good news!) is that for every stage of your journey there are organisations and people out there who can help you.  Soundz Off ensures you don’t have to travel that journey alone and we can all learn to cope better with hearing loss in a hearing world.

So, as I said at the beginning, welcome to the club!  Good to meet you.

Tania Le Marinel

 

The joys of travelling with hearing loss ….. not!

One of the things that hearing people don’t realise is the amount of ‘kit’ that comes with any type of hearing loss.  Hearing aids, batteries, boxes, moulds … that’s just for starters.  If you still have the ability to listen to music, then the list just expands exponentially and you need a special suitcase just for your hearing gear.

For example, a hearing person can just get onto a plane, plug in the headset and go.  I wish!  Headsets are no use when the microphones in your hearing aids are at the TOP of your head, while headsets are designed to go over the CENTRE of your ears, so unless you want to have your headset perched on the top of your head like a parrot then that’s not going to work!  So I end up taking a whole bag full of paraphernalia depending on the circumstances.

I have a hearing loop which I can wear round my neck.  Brilliant, sorted?  Er, nope!  Because nobody in the electronics industry has ever thought about what it’s like to be deaf and nobody has ever thought about making life easier for us by standardising the size of jacks on the end of electronic widget cables.  So, my hearing loop doesn’t plug into the hole in the aircraft arm because the plug is too small.  So I need a bigger jack size – I learned by trial and error to bring it with me and it took a bit of tracking down but I eventually found one.  I plug it into the plane arm-rest and rrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrr!  All I can hear on the loop is feedback/interference from the plane’s engines.  So that’s not an option 🙁

So I decide to listen to some music on my iPod but the plug on the end of my hearing loop is too big!  So I need yet another jack, a smaller one, which takes even more tracking down.  So now I have a phone, a loop, two jacks, hearing aids and batteries.  Then I need a charger for my loop and  a charger for my iPod.  Add to that my streamer so I can connect by Bluetooth to electronic devices (just not on planes), the additional chargers for the streamer, my Kindle and my iPhone and I might as well just give up and pay the excess baggage charge now!

PLUS I need to take all this kit on the plane with me – the guys at Passport Control are all peering at this spaghetti junction of electronic wiring and gadgets with great suspicion.  Nothing like trying to explain about hearing loop technology to an irate security guard on high terrorism alert in the middle of the Christmas rush at Heathrow airport.  Honestly officer, it’s just so I can watch the new Hobbit film on the plane!  And don’t even get me started about the incomprehensibly garbled announcements about plane departure times ….. sigh!

Sigh. wiring